The Glossary
Introduction
Definitions
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Lord of The Rings
The Hobbit
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Lord of the Rings T - Z

Alphabetical A-D

Alphabetical E - K

Alphabetical L- S

Alphabetical T - Z

Book 1

Book 2

Book 3

Book 4

Book 5

Book 6

Appendices

Word

Page 1st Used

Meaning as used in The Lord of the Rings

Context of use, sentence used in

tackle

105

Equipment, apparatus, or gear in general.

See text above for stores.

tamarisk

657

A plant of the old-world tropical genus Tamarix, esp. T. gallica, native in the Mediterranean region, an ornamental shrub or small tree with slender, feathery branches.

Many great trees grew there, planted long ago, falling into untended age amid a riot of careless descendants; and groves and thickets there were of tamarisk and pungent terebinth, of olive and of bay; and there were junipers and myrtles; and thymes that g

tang

846

A strong taste or flavor; a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself; a pungent or distinctive odor; a suggestion of something.

There comes a breath out of the South; there is a sea-tang in it, faint though it be.

tankard

156

A large drinking vessel.

He had a tall tankard in front of him, and was smoking a long-stemmed pipe curiously carved.

tarried

234

To delay; also, to wait for, or await.

that tarried in Arvernien;

tarrying

79

To delay; also to wait for, or await.

We are Exiles, and most of our kindred have long ago departed and we too are now only tarrying here a while, ere we return over the Great Sea.

teeming

898

Prolific, fertile, abounding or swarming with something; hence, existing in swarms or great numbers.

Yet they knew that all the hills and rocks about the Morannon were filled with hidden foes, and the shadowy defile beyond was bored and tunneled by teeming broods of evil things.

tempest

537

An extensive current of wind rushing with great velocity and violence, esp. one attended with rain, hail or snow; a violent storm; a violent commotion, disturbance, or tumult; a violent outburst.

Then the Orcs screamed, waving spear and sword, and shooting a cloud of arrows at any that stood revealed upon the battlements; and the men of the Mark amazed looked out, as it seemed to them, upon a great field of dark corn, tossed by a tempest of war, a

terebinth

657

A moderate sized anacardiaceous tree, Pistacia terebinthus, of the Mediterranean regions, having pinnate leaves and panicles of inconspicuous flowers, and yielding Chian (of or pertaining to Chios, an island in the Aegean Sea) turpentine.

See text above for tamarisk.

testy

592

Headstrong; also, prone to impatience and irritation, or irritably impatient of contradiction or opposition.

'All right, I'll tackle Strider by the camp-fire: he's less testy.

thane

813

Servant, retainer, soldier, thane, man; in early English history, a member of any of several classes of men ranking between earls and ordinary freemen, and holding the lands of the king or lord by military service; in Scottish history, a person, ranking w

with thane and captain rode Thengel's son:

The Fellowship of the ring

   

The Return of the King

   

The Two Towers

     

thickets

75

A thick or dense growth of shrubs, bushes, or small trees; a thick coppice.

See text above for tussocky.

thither

236

To or toward that place or point.

herself was set, who thither came

thongs

330

A narrow strip or hide or leather, used as a fastening, as the lash of a whip etc.; also, a similar strip of some other material.

In its right hand was a blade like a stabbing tongue of fire; in its left it held a whip of many thongs.

thrawn

394

Twisted; crooked.

Before the travellers lay a wide ravine, with great rocky sides to which clung, upon shelves and in narrow crevices, a few thrawn trees.

throes

38

A violent spasm or pang (a sudden, brief sharp pain, or a spasm or severe twinge of pain); also, a sharp attack of emotion.

Her face looked as if she was in the throes of thinking out a really crushing parting remark; but all she found to say, turning round on the step, was: 'You'll live to regret it, young fellow!

thronged

355

A great number of things crowded or considered together; also to fill or occupy with as with a crowd.

Upon the further side there rose to a great height a green wall encircling a green hill thronged with mallorn-trees taller than any they had yet seen in all the land.

thwart

436

To be adverse, in opposition, or at variance; hindrance.

Will you aid me or thwart me?

tidings

81

Happenings, tidings, news; the announcement of an event or occurrence not previously made known.

The tidings were mostly sad and ominous: of gathering darkness, the wars of Men, and the flight of the Elves.

tidy

23

Considerable.

'There's a tidy bit of money tucked away up there, I hear tell,' said a stranger, a visitor on business from Michel Delving in the Westfarthing.

tilth

758

The act or operation of tilling; tillage; cultivation; land under cultivation.

The townlands were rich, with wide tilth and many orchards, and homesteads there were with oast and garner, fold and byre, and many rills rippling through the green from the highlands down to Anduin.

tipsy

158

Affected by liquor so as to stagger slightly or be without full control of the movements and faculties; intoxicated, but not to complete drunkenness or stupor.

See text above for ostler.

tithe

779

A tenth part, or any infinitely small part, or anything.

They are sparing only a tithe of their strength.

token

7

Something serving to represent or indicate some fact, event, feeling, etc.; a sign; a symbol.

And as the days of the Shire lengthened they spoke less and less with the Elves, and grew afraid of them, and distrustful of those that had dealings with them; and the Sea became a word of fear among them, and a token of death, and they turned their faces

too much of a good thing

21

An act, behavior, etc., spoilt by its excess.

There were some that shook their heads and thought this was too much of a good thing ; it seemed unfair that anyone should possess (apparently) perpetual youth as well as (reputedly) inexhaustible wealth.

tor

932

A rocky eminence; a hill.

There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while.

tortuous

376

Twisting, winding. Full of twist, turns and bends.

See text above for fen.

tossocky

75

A tuft or clump of growing grass or the like; abounding in tussocks.

But this hindered them; for the grass was thick and tussocky, and the ground uneven, and the trees began to draw together into thickets.

traceries

762

Any delicate interlacing work of lines, threads, etc., as in carving, embroidery, etc.

See text above for capitals.

traffic

73

Transportation of goods for the purpose of trade, by sea or land; hence, trade between different countries or place, or commerce.

This way was not much used, being hardly fit for carts, and there was little traffic to the Woody End.

trammel

878

To catch or entangle in or as in a trammel or net.

See text above for hutch.

trapessing

24

To walk in a slovenly manner, esp. with the dress trailing or draggled; walk aimlessly or idly about.

See text above for prentice.

trappings

669

A cloth or covering for a horse, etc., esp. when ornamental in character, or a comparison. Articles of equipment or dress, esp. of an ornamental character.

His trappings of scarlet and gold flapped about him in wild tatters.

treachery

11

Deceiver, cheater; deceiving, perfidious (deliberately faithless), or faithless; violating faith or betraying trust; disloyal, traitorous; untrustworthy.

But after ages alone in the dark Gollum's heart was black, and treachery was in it.

treachery

901

deceiver, cheater; deceiving, perfidious (deliberately faithless), or faithless; violating faith or betraying trust'; disloyal, traitorous; untrustworthy.

See text above for base.

treat

587

To handle or discuss an affair with a view to settlement; negotiate; also, to deal with in speech or writing.

If you wish to treat with me, while you have a chance, go away, and come back when you are sober!

tresses

379

Tress -  a plait or braid of the hair or head; also, any long lock or curl of hair, esp. of a woman, not plaited (a braid, as of hair or straw) or braided.

Then the Lady unbraided one of her long tresses, and cut off three golden hairs, and laid them in Gimli's hand.

trestles

681

A frame used as a support, consisting typically of a horizontal beam or bar fixed at each end to a pair of spreading legs; sometimes, the whole frame which supports the top of a table.

Light tables were taken from the walls and set up on trestles and laden with gear.

tributary

901

Paying or requiring to pay tribute; hence, furnishing subsidiary aid; consideration paid by one sovereign or state to another in acknowledgement of submission or as the price of peace, security, protection.

West of the Anduin as far as the Misty Mountains and the Gap of Rohan shall be tributary to Mordor, and men there shall bear no weapons, but shall have leave to govern their own affairs.

tribute

263

A tax or impost paid by one prince or state to another in acknowledgement of submission or as the price of peace, security, and protection; rent or homage paid in money or an equivalent by a subject to his sovereign or a vassal to his lord.

"They pay a tribute of horses," he answered, "and send many yearly to Mordor, or so it is said; but they are not yet under the yoke.

troth

699

Faithfulness; fidelity, or loyalty; also, one's word or promise; to plight one's troth or word to; engage by a contract.

For it seems less evil to counsel another man to break troth than to do so oneself, especially if one sees a friend bound unwitting to his own harm.

troth

1072

Faithfulness, fidelity, or loyalty' also, one's word or promise; one's word pledged in engaging one's self to marry.

See text above for plighted.

trothplighted

989

Engaged by troth or promise, esp. of marriage; betrothed.

Therefore they shall be trothplighted before you all.'

trotting

69

The gait of a horse, etc., when trotting; in general, a jogging gate between a walk and a run, quick, continuous movement.

Presently Sam appeared, trotting quickly and breathing hard; his heavy pack was hoisted high on his shoulders, and he had put on his head a tall shapeless fell bag, which he called a hat.

trove

250

Something of value found.

'You speak for me also,' he cried, and turning to Elrond he said: 'The Wise may have good reason to believe that the halfling's trove is indeed the Great Ring of long debate, unlikely though that may seem to those who know less.

truncheon

326

Broken piece. A piece broken off, esp. from a spear or lance; the shaft of a spear.

But even as the orc flung down the truncheon and swept out his scimitar, Andril came down upon his helm.

tryst

265

An appointment to meet at a certain time and place; also an appointed meeting.

But such a thing has not happened before, that Gandalf broke tryst and did not come when he promised.

tumult

539

The commotion or disturbance of a multitude, usually with noise.

Gamling the Old looked down from the Hornburg, hearing the great voice of the dwarf above all the tumult.

tunic

278

A garment like a shirt or a gown.

Bilbo put it on him, and fastened Sting upon the glittering belt; and then Frodo put over the top his old weather-stained breeches, tunic, and jacket.

turves

7

Turf. A piece cut or torn from the surface of grassland, with grass, etc. growing on it; a sod; often the grassy covering of a grave.

The oldest kind were, indeed, no more than built imitations of smials, thatched with dry grass or straw, or roofed with turves, and having walls somewhat bulged.

turves

443

Turf. A piece cut or torn from the surface of grassland, with grass, etc. growing on it; a sod; often the grassy covering of a grave.

It was newly raised: the raw earth was covered with fresh-cut turves: about it were planted fifteen spears.

twain

762

Two; also, to be separate, disunited, or at variance.

'One of the twain.

twined

376

To become twisted together, as two things, or as one thing with another; also, to wind by itself.

And in a fading crown have twined the golden elanor.

umbels

192

An umbrella shaped plant.

 The hemlock-umbels tall and fair,

unabated

731

Not abated or lessened; not reduced in amount, intensity, etc.

It pleased him that she should dwell there hungry an unabated in malice, a more sure watch upon that ancient path into his land than any other that his skill could have devised.

uncouth

150

Uncultured, strange.

The Shire-hobbits referred to those of Bree, and to any others that lived beyond the borders, as Outsiders, and took very little interest in them, considering them dull and uncouth.

uncouth

582

Unfamiliar, unusual, unpleasant; strange and alarming; awkward, clumsy.

When others spoke they seemed harsh and uncouth by contrast; and if they gainsaid the voice, anger was kindled in the hearts of those under the spell.

ungentle

973

Not gentle; harsh; rough.

I am a shieldmaiden and my hand is ungentle.

unheralded

235

Not proclaimed or announced beforehand.

unheralded he homeward sped.

unmanned

897

To deprive of the character or qualities of a man or human being; also, to deprive of virility, or emasculate; also, to deprive of manly courage or fortitude, or break down the manly spirit of.

So desolate were those places and so deep the horror that lay on them that some of the host were unmanned, and they could neither walk or ride further north.

unquiet

559

Not quiet; restless; uneasy or perturbed; agitated or in commotion; not silent or still.

Shafts were driven deep into the ground; their upper ends were covered by low mounds and domes of stone, so that in the moonlight the Ring of Isengard looked like a graveyard of unquiet dead.

unsullied

709

Not sullied; unspoiled; spotless; stainless; untarnished.

See text above for pall.

unthrottled

628

Not throttled. Throttle: to stop the breath of by compressing the throat; strangle; sometimes, to choke or suffocate in any way.

They were at any rate both alive and unthrottled.

uppish

1018

Proud; arrogant; self-assertive; assuming.

You little folk are getting too uppish.

upstart

865

One who has risen suddenly form a humble position to wealth or power, or to assumed consequence.

See text above for chamberlain.

urchins

996

A kind of elf or mischievous sprite (spirit); hence, a mischievous boy, or any small boy, or youngster.

'So you have come to gloat too, have you, my urchins? he said.

usurpers

131

To seize and hold (an office or position, power, etc.) by force or without right. Seizing or holding a place of power without right.

Tom's words laid bare the hearts of the trees and their thoughts, which were often dark and strange, and filled with a hatred of things that go free upon the earth, gnawing, biting, breaking, hacking, burning: destroyers and usurpers.

vales

3

A valley.

Their earliest tales seem to glimpse a time when they dwelt in the upper vales of Anduin, between the eaves of Greenwood the Great and the Misty Mountains.

valour

858

British preferred form of valor; also, valiant persons, or a valiant person (rare); also, value or worth.

See text above for dour.

van

533

The foremost division or the front part of an army, a fleet, or any body of individuals advancing or in order for advancing; the foremost position in such a body.

Aragorn and Legolas went now with omer in the van.

vanguard

531

The foremost division of an army; the van; a part of an army detached from the main body to clear the way and guard against surprise from the front.

In the last red glow men in the vanguard saw a black speck, a horseman riding back towards them.

varmint

91

An objectionable or troublesome person; a mischievous child.

"See, lads," he said, "next time this young varmint sets foot on my land, you can eat him.

vassals

959

Servant, retainer, vassal. In the feudal system, a person holding lands by the obligation to render military service or its equivalent to his superior.

Behind them in long swift lines came all their vassals from the northern mountains, speeding on a gathering wind.

verily

246

In very truth; truly; really; indeed.

Give me leave, Master Elrond,' said he, 'first to say more of Gondor; for verily from the land of Gondor I am come.

veritably

908

In accordance with the truth or fact, or true, as statements, etc.

He felt that if once he went beyond the crown of the pass and took one step veritably down into that land of Mordor, that step would be irrevocable.

victuals

681

Of or for sustenance. Food or provisions, usually for human beings.

As their eyes grew accustomed to the gloom the hobbits saw that the cave was larger than they guessed and was filled with great store of arms and victuals.

vie

263

To strive in competition or rivalry with another; contend for superiority.

The horses of the Nine cannot vie with him; tireless, swift as the flowing wind.

vigil

460

A devotional watching, or keeping awake, during the customary hours of sleep; wakefulness, watch.

The Riders had returned to their silent ominous vigil.

viols

977

A musical instrument,, or various sizes, shapes, etc., having a hollow body, a neck, a finger board, and strings, and played with a bow; esp., an old (medieval and later) type having from five to seven strings, and made in four sizes.

And the City was filled again with women and fair children that returned to their homes laden with flowers; and from Dol Amroth came the harpers that harped most skillfully in all the land; and there were players upon viols and upon flutes and upon horns

vomit

730

To be ejected or come out with force or violence; spew, utter.

But she was still there, who was there before Sauron, and before the first stone of Barad-dr; and she served none but herself, drinking the blood of Elves and Men, bloated and grown fat with endless brooding on her feasts, weaving webs of shadow; for all

waft

896

To carry or send (sounds, odors, smoke, dust, etc.) through the air; also, to float or be carried through the air.

The weather of the world remained fair, and the wind held in the west, but nothing could waft away the glooms and the sad mists that clung about the Mountains of Shadow; and behind them at whiles great smokes would arise and hover in the upper winds.

wafts

864

Bear, carry, or propel over the water, as the waves, wind, etc. do.

And even now the wind of thy hope cheats thee and wafts up Anduin a fleet with black sails.

wains

403

Wagon; vehicle, or cart.

From the havens of Harad ships of war put out to sea; and out of the East Men were moving endlessly: swordsmen, spearmen, bowmen upon horses, chariots of chieftains and laden with wains.

wallowing

100

To roll or tumble about as an animal or person on the ground, a vessel on the waves.

Snatches of competing songs came from the bathroom mixed with the sound of splashing and wallowing.

wan

235

Dark or gloomy; also, wanting in brightness, pale or faint, as stars, light, etc.

the yellow gold and jewels wan.

waning

267

Wanting, deficient; to decrease in size or in quantity.

Only the waning might of Gondor stands now between him and a march in power along the coasts into the North; and if he comes, assailing the White Towers and the Havens, hereafter the Elves may have no escape from the lengthening shadows of Middle-earth.'

wantonly

658

Reckless or disrespectful of right, justice, etc; maliciously or unjustifiably.

They had not come very far from the road, and yet even in so short a space they had seen scars of the old wars, and the newer wounds made by the Orcs and other foul servants of the Dark Lord: a pit of uncovered filth and refuse; trees hewn down wantonly a

warbling

183

To sing with trills, quavers, melodic embellishments, in a free and joyous manner.

The ground now became damp, and in places boggy and here and there they came upon pools, and wide stretches of reeds and rushes filled with the warbling of little hidden birds.

ward

439

To keep guard or protective watch over; to keep safe from harm; defend or protect.

The east-mark is my charge, the ward of the Third Marshal, and I have removed all our herds and herdfolk, withdrawing them beyond the Entwash, and leaving none here but guards and swift scouts.'

wards

780

A division or district of a town or city.

Lights sprang in many windows, and from the houses and wards of the men at arms along the walls there came the sound of song.

ware

667

To be on one's guard; look out; beware: used esp. in the imperative: as, 'Ware!' Watchful, wary, cautious; also, aware of conscious.

'Ware! Ware!' cried Damrod to his companion.

warrant

44

To give a formal assurance, or guarantee or promise.

But I warrant you haven't seen them doing it; nor any one else in the Shire.'

warren

23

A habitation having passages like burrows. A building or collection or buildings containing many tenants in limited quarters. The word is associated with rabbits, rabbit holes, etc.

A regular warren, by all accounts.

wavered

141

To exhibit doubt or indecision; to change or vary; to fluctuate or vacillate (between); to falter in resolution or allegiance; to show signs of giving way.

He wavered, groping in his pocket, and then fought with himself again; and as he did so the arm crept nearer.

wavering

192

To sway to and fro.

In the wintry woodland wavering.

waxing

185

To increase in extent or size; of the moon, to undergo the periodical increase in the extent of its illuminated portion before the full (as opposed to wane).

The moon was waxing, and in the early night-hours a cold grey light lay on the land.

waylay

501

To lie in wait for (a traveler, passer-by, etc.) on the way; fall upon or assail from ambush, as in order to rob, seize, or slay.

For already he knows that the messengers that he sent to waylay the Company have failed again.

wayside

78

Side of the way; the border or edge of the road or highway.

The hobbits sat in the shadow by the wayside.

wayward

375

bottom l

See text above for lade.

wayward

584

Turned away from the proper course, wayward; turned away from what is right and proper, or froward or perverse. Disposed to turn wilfully from what is proper, reasonable, or expected, in order to follow one's own impulses or whims.

You may find the Shadow of the Wood at your own door next: it is wayward, and senseless, and has no love for Men.

wayworn

689

Worn or wearied by travel.

And you are far from home and wayworn.

weal

920

A wale or welt. See wale. Wale - a streak, stripe, or ridge produced on the skin by the stroke of a rod or whip.

He was naked, lying as if in a swoon on a heap of filthy rags: his arm was flung up, shielding his head, and across his side there ran an ugly whip-weal.

weapontake

787

From Old Norse. A territorial division. Part of a country or the judicial court of such a subdivision, more commonly known as a Hundred. A Hundred was expected to send 100 warriors when requested. Also, the act of signifying assent at a public assembly; a

It would be a great company; for the king was leaving only a small garrison in the Burg, and all who could be spared were riding to the weapontake at Edoras.

webs

762

Something resembling woven fabric.

No hangings nor storied webs, nor any things of woven stuff or of wood, were to be seen in that long solemn hall; but between the pillars there stood a silent company of tall images graven in cold stone.

well-knit

814

Knit - to make compact or firm by contraction of consolidation of parts.

See text above for lithe

wellnigh

773

Very nearly; almost.

Perhaps it was the mountains looming on the verge of sight, their jagged edges softened by wellnigh twenty leagues of misty air; perhaps it was but a cloud-wall, and beyond that again a yet deeper gloom.

welter

908

To roll, toss or heave, as waves, the sea, etc.

The vast vapours that arose in Mordor and went steaming westward passed low overhead, a great welter of cloud and smoke now lit again beneath with a sullen glow of red.

weregild

244

Payment. A fine for manslaughter and other crimes against the person, by pain which to the relative of the deceased in the case of manslaughter, or to the injured person in the case of a wound or the like, the offender freed himself from every further obl

"This I will have as weregild for my father, and my brother," he said; and therefore whether or no, he took it to treasure it.

weskit

1026

A vest or waistcoat.

What's come of his weskit?

whatever-it-was

 

Denoting an unnamed person, thing, quality, etc.; chiefly used as a perfunctory designation of anything a speaker is reluctant or unable to describe specifically.

For the whatever-it-was was coming along fast now and getting close behind Gimli.

Whence

241

From what place?; hence, from source or origin?

Whence it came we did not at first perceive.

wherefore

368

Interrogative adverb. For what?

Do you not see now wherefore your coming is to us as the footstep of Doom?

whetting

540

To sharpen (a knife, tool, etc.) by grinding or friction.

The elf was whetting his long knife.

whiles

312

At times.

And he was in any case the bearer of the Ring: it hung upon its chain against his breast, and at whiles it seemed a heavy weight.

whin

334

Basaltic rock; any of various other hard rocks; also, a mass or piece of such rock.

It was rough and broken, fading to a winding track between heather and whin that thrust amid the cracking stones.

whither

8

Interrogative adverb. To what place?; hence, to what point, end, course, etc.; to extent or how far.

'All the same, observations that I have made on my own many journeys south have convinced me that the weed itself is not native to our parts of the world, but came northward from the lower Anduin, whither it was, I suspect, originally brought over Sea by

whither

35

Toward what place?

 And whither then? I cannot say.

Wights

134

A living being or creature; also, a supernatural or unearthly being.

Don't you go a-meddling with old stone or cold Wights or prying in their houses, unless you be strong folk with hearts that never falter!'

wiles

649

A trick, artifice, or stratagem; an artful of beguiling procedure. To trick, or deceive; also, to beguile, entice, or lure (away, from, into, etc.).

But even if Gollum could be trusted on this point, Frodo did not forget the wiles of the enemy.

wilt

795

Second person singular present indicative of will: now only in poetic or solemn use.

But she said: 'Aragorn, wilt thou go?'

win

818

To strive; also, to succeed by striving or effort; get (in, out, through, etc.); also, to make one's way, as by effort, ability, etc. to reach a point, goal, etc.

But how can he win to the Gate, if these foul hell-hawks have other weapons than fear?

wistfully

375

Pensive or melancholy; longing; showing a feeling of longing tinged with melancholy; an ostentatious display.

Sam sat in the bows, clutching the sides, and looking back wistfully to the shore.

wits

11

Understanding, intelligence.

In the end Bilbo won the game, more by luck (as it seemed) than by wits; for he was stumped at last for a riddle to ask, and cried out, as his hand came upon the ring he lad picked up and forgotten: What have I got in my pocket?

wizened

331

Withered or shriveled as from drying.

...Gandalf could be seen, glimmering in the gloom; he seemed small, and altogether alone: grey and bent, like a wizened tree before the onset of a storm.

woe

89

An exclamation of grief, distress, or lamentation; grievous distress, affliction, or trouble.

To heal my heart and drown my woe.

wold

384

An open, elevated tract of country: esp. applied in plural, to districts in parts of England (as Yorkshire and Lincolnshire), resembling the downs of the southern counties.

The Brown Lands rose into bleak wolds, over which flowed a chill air from the East.

wont

357

Accustomed; used, to accustom as to a thing; also to render (a thing) customary or usual.

Her voice was clear and musical, but deeper than a woman's wont.

wont

757

Accustomed; used; to accustom (a person), as to a thing; custom; habit; practice.

'But you come with tidings of grief and danger, as is your wont, they say.'

worriting

96

Provincial form of worry.

Mrs. Maggot will be worriting with the night getting thick.'

worsted

143

To give (one) the worst or a contest or struggle; defeat; beat.

'Of course, I remember!' he said. 'The men of Carn Dm came on us at night, and we were worsted.

worthies

175

Persons of eminent worth or merit; having worth; estimable, as a person.

The worthies of Bree will be discussing it a hundred years hence.'

wrack

367

Wreck or wreckage cast ashore by the sea; also, shipwreck hence, ruin or destruction.

Then he saw against the Sun, sinking blood-red into a wrack of clouds, the black outline of a tall ship with torn sails riding up out of the West.

wraith

185

An apparition of a living person, or of one supposed to be living, popularly reputed to portend or indicate his death; in general, a visible spirit; a ghost.

I hope the thinning process will not go on indefinitely, or I shall become a wraith.'

wrath

101

Angry; strong, stern or fierce anger.

A fact which partly explains young Frodo's long expeditions to the renowned fields of the Marish, and the wrath of the injured Maggot.

wreathe

567

To encircle or adorn with.

'Time wears on, and the mists are blowing away, or would if you strange folk did not wreathe yourselves in smoke.

wreathed

330

To encircle or adorn with.

The flames roared up to greet it, and wreathed about it; and a black smoke swirled in the air.

wrested

866

To twist or turn; esp., to twist or turn from the proper course, application, use, or the like; to take away by force.

Then taking the key that he had wrested from the slain man he closed the door and locked it.

wrestling

773

 

Some say that as he sits alone in his high chamber in the Tower at night, and bends his thought this way and that, he can read somewhat of the future; and that he will at times search even the mind of the Enemy, wrestling with him.

writ

677

Something written, or a writing.

We in the house of Denethor know much ancient lore by long tradition, and there are moreover in our treasuries many things preserved: books and tablets writ on withered parchments, yea, and on stone, and on leaves of silver and of gold, in divers characte

writhen

387

Twisted; contorted.

Behind them stood low crumbling cliffs, and chimneys of grey weathered stone dark with ivy; and beyond these again there rose high ridges crowned with wind-writhen firs.

written

903

Write - to trace or form (characters, letters, words, etc.) on a surface of some material, as with a pen, pencil, or other instrument or means; inscribe. To make or cover with writing.

Then Pippin stabbed upwards, and the written blade of Westernesse pierced through the hide and went deep into the vitals of the troll, and his black blood came gushing out.

wroth

438

Affected with anger; incensed; wrathful.

He is wroth.

wrought

50

Worked; elaborated, made.

If he recovers it, then he will command them all again, wherever they be, even the Three, and all that has been wrought with them will be laid bare, and he will be stronger than ever.

wry face

526

A twisted face or mouth.

'Say also,' said Gandalf, 'that to crooked eyes truth may wear a wry face.'

yammered

127

Mourn, complain, sad, mournful; to lament, wail, whine, the act of yammering; a loud or persistent talk.

The voices wailed and the wolves yammered.

yoke

263

To become joined, united; to bring into subjection, servitude; also, figurative, any power, rule, or influence entailing subjection or bondage.

See text above for tribute.

yonder

68

At, in or to that place over there.

He's moved to Bucklebury or some such place, away down yonder.

yore

237

Of old; years ago; long ago.

in Elder Days, in years of yore.

Copyright © 2004-2010 by Oliver Loo